Expertly reviewed by
#adacompliance #webcompliance
10 minutes

26 Steps for ADA Website Compliance: See All Requirements

This is a complete guide to ADA compliance in 2024.

So, if you’re looking to understand what ADA compliance is and how can you make sure you are compliant, you’ve come to the right place!

Let’s dive right in

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), enacted in 1990 by President George H.W. Bush, is a landmark civil rights law that prohibits discrimination against people with disabilities in all areas of public life, including jobs, schools, transportation, and public and private spaces.

The ADA primarily benefits people with various disabilities, including but not limited to visual impairments, auditory impairments, mobility impairments, and cognitive impairments. For instance, blind people rely on screen readers to navigate websites, while those with mobility impairments such as spina bifida may use alternative input devices.

The ADA consists of five titles, each addressing different aspects of disability rights and accessibility:

  • Title I: Employment. Title I prohibits discrimination against qualified people with disabilities in all aspects of employment, including hiring, job assignments, promotions, and termination. 
  • Title II: State and Local Government Services. Title II prevents discrimination by state and local governments and their agencies, ensuring that people with disabilities have equal access to public services, programs, and activities. This includes public transportation, public schools, government offices, and other government-funded services.
  • Title III: Public Accommodations and Commercial Facilities. Title III requires businesses and other entities open to the public to ensure their facilities are accessible to the disabled community. 
  • Title IV: Telecommunications. Title IV requires telephone and internet companies to provide relay services for individuals with hearing and speech disabilities, ensuring they have equal access to telecommunications services. 
  • Title V: Miscellaneous Provisions. Title V contains various provisions related to the ADA, including the relationship between the ADA and other laws, enforcement procedures, and the prohibition of retaliation against individuals exercising their rights under the ADA.

ADA compliance isn’t just about physical spaces; it extends to online spaces, too. This means that websites, mobile applications, and other online platforms must also be accessible to people with disabilities.

In this guide, we will provide you with a comprehensive checklist for ADA website compliance, covering all the essential requirements and considerations. A downloadable PDF will be provided, offering a handy reference guide for website owners and developers striving for accessibility and inclusivity.

Here’s a Brief Video Summary of ADA Compliance in 2024

What Is ADA Compliance?

ADA compliance refers to the adherence to the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) standards and regulations, particularly the Americans with Disabilities Act Standards for Accessible Design (ADAAG). This comprehensive set of guidelines ensures that people with disabilities have equal access to various aspects of public life, including employment, transportation, and businesses.

In the realm of employment, ADA compliance requires employers to provide reasonable accommodations to qualified people with disabilities, ensuring they can perform essential job functions. This may include modifications to the work environment, job duties, or equipment to ensure accessibility and equal opportunity in the workplace.

Transportation services, both public and private, must also comply with ADA regulations to ensure accessibility for the disabled. This includes providing accessible vehicles, transportation facilities, and services such as wheelchair ramps, lifts, and adequate signage.

Businesses open to the public, including restaurants, shops, hotels, and entertainment venues, are required to comply with ADA standards to ensure that their facilities and services are accessible to people with disabilities. This includes installing wheelchair ramps and providing accessible restrooms, as well as accommodations for effective communication and access to goods and services.

Because so much of daily life now takes place online, ADA compliance also extends to websites and online platforms. Websites related to employment, transportation services, and businesses must adhere to ADA standards to ensure accessibility for all. 

By ensuring ADA compliance in all areas of public life, including employment, transportation, and business in general, we can create a more inclusive and accessible society where people with disabilities have equal opportunities and access to essential services and resources.

What Is ADA Compliance for Websites?

ADA website compliance means making websites and digital content accessible to people with disabilities in accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and related guidelines, such as the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG).

WCAG was created by the World Wide Web Consortium and is the benchmark for website accessibility requirements in various global disability acts.

According to WCAG, websites need to adhere to the following principles:

  • Perceivable: Information and user interface components need to be presented in ways that users can perceive, regardless of their sensory abilities. This may include providing alternative text for images, captions for videos, and clear content organization.
  • Operable: Making web content and navigation functions operable through various input methods, such as keyboard navigation, voice commands, or assistive technologies like screen readers, ensures that users can interact with and navigate a website effectively.
  • Understandable: Understandable means ensuring that content and functionality are understandable to all users, including those with cognitive or learning disabilities. This involves using clear language, providing instructions and feedback, and avoiding complex or ambiguous design elements.
  • Robust: Websites should be compatible with a wide range of assistive technologies and devices. This includes using semantic HTML, providing proper document structure, and testing for compatibility with screen readers and other assistive tools.

Infographic: WCAG website compliance principles

Complying with the latest web accessibility requirements benefits users with a variety of disabilities, including those with low vision or blindness, people who are deaf, users with mobility impairments, as well as people with neurological or cognitive disabilities such as ADHD and epilepsy.

Businesses and entities across various sectors need to comply with web accessibility standards to ensure that their digital content is accessible to individuals with disabilities. This includes:

  • Government institutions.
  • Education institutions.
  • Non-profit organizations.
  • Commercial businesses.
  • eCommerce websites.
  • Healthcare providers.
  • Financial institutions.

What Are the Requirements for ADA Website Compliance?

Now that we’ve covered the essentials of the ADA and how it relates to website compliance, let’s delve into the various areas that site owners and developers need to focus on to provide a more accessible and inclusive experience for users.

1. Ensure All Site Interactions Can Be Accessed with a Keyboard

Keyboard navigation is required to comply with ADA web accessibility requirements because it ensures equal access to digital content for people with disabilities. 

Keyboard navigation is a fundamental accessibility feature that allows users to navigate through web pages, interact with interactive elements, and access content without the need for a mouse or other pointing device. 

By ensuring keyboard navigability, businesses demonstrate their commitment to inclusivity and accessibility, which can enhance the user experience, expand their customer base, and mitigate the risk of legal consequences related to non-compliance with ADA regulations.

Keyboard navigation benefits people with various disabilities, including those with:

  • Mobility impairments: Users who have difficulty using a mouse or other pointing device due to conditions such as arthritis, paralysis, or fine motor impairments.
  • Visual impairments: People who rely on screen readers or magnification software and may navigate websites using keyboard shortcuts and tab keys.
  • Cognitive impairments: Users who may have difficulty processing complex or dynamic content and find keyboard navigation more straightforward than mouse-based navigation.

If a website is not accessible via keyboard navigation, disabled users who rely on keyboard input may encounter significant barriers when trying to access your content, navigate through pages, or interact with interactive elements on your site. 

Without keyboard accessibility, these users may be unable to perform essential tasks such as filling out forms, selecting options from drop-down menus, or accessing links and buttons, effectively excluding them from accessing your site’s content and services.

Testing for Keyboard Navigation

You can check whether your website is keyboard operable by navigating through your website using only a keyboard, without using a mouse or other pointing device. Pay attention to the following:

  • Use the Tab key to navigate through links, buttons, form fields, and interactive elements on the page.
  • Ensure that each interactive element receives focus when navigating with the Tab key and that the focus indicator is visible.
  • Use keyboard shortcuts, such as Enter or Spacebar, to activate buttons and links.
  • Verify that all interactive elements are accessible and usable via keyboard input, including dropdown menus, sliders, and interactive widgets.
  • Test for logical keyboard navigation order and ensure that the tab order follows a logical sequence that matches the visual layout of the page.

Remediating Your Website

Remediating your site to be keyboard navigable will require you to make several changes to the code of your website.

For example, if you want to ensure that interactive elements receive focus and can be activated using keyboard input, you would implement the following code:

<button tabindex=”0″>Click Me</button>

In this example, the button element has a tabindex attribute set to “0”, which allows it to receive focus when navigating with the Tab key. Users can then press the Enter key to activate the button, making it accessible via keyboard input. Additionally, using semantic HTML and proper markup ensures that interactive elements are accessible to assistive technologies and comply with web accessibility standards.

2. Provide Alt Attributes for All Images

Businesses should add alt tags to their images to comply with ADA web accessibility because alt tags provide alternative text descriptions that are read aloud by screen readers to users who are blind or visually impaired. 

By including descriptive alt text, businesses ensure that people who cannot see images can still understand the content and context of the images, enhancing their overall browsing experience and ensuring equal access to information.

Alt tags mainly benefit people with low vision or blindness who rely on screen readers to access digital content. However, users with cognitive disabilities can also benefit from alt tags that provide additional context or clarification for images. The tags make the content more understandable and reduce cognitive load.

Without alt tags, disabled people who rely on assistive technologies may encounter difficulties or barriers when accessing websites with images. Screen readers will not be able to provide meaningful descriptions of images, leaving users with visual impairments unable to understand the content and context of the images. As a result, these users may miss out on important information or features of a website, leading to a less inclusive and accessible browsing experience.

Testing for Alt Tags

You can check whether your website has alt tags by inspecting the HTML code for images and verifying the presence of alt attributes. Alternatively, you can use web accessibility testing tools or browser extensions that analyze web pages for accessibility issues, including missing alt attributes on images.

Remediating Your Website

Adding alt tags to the images on your site needs to happen at a code level. An image with alternative text will look like this in your HTML code:

<img src=”example.jpg” alt=”Description of the image”>

In this example, the img element includes an alt attribute with a descriptive text (“Description of the image”). This alt text will be read aloud by screen readers, providing users with visual impairments with a textual description of the image content. 

It is essential to provide accurate and meaningful alt text that conveys the purpose and content of the image effectively. Alt tags are not required for decorative images, but a blank alt tag should still be included in your HTML code. 

3. Ensure Text Has Adequate Color Contrast

To comply with the latest ADA web accessibility standards, businesses should ensure that text on their website has adequate color contrast.

Color contrast makes content readable and understandable for all users, including those with visual impairments or color vision deficiencies. Proper color contrast enhances readability and legibility, particularly for users with low vision or other visual impairments, ensuring that text is distinguishable from the background and easily discernible.

Along with benefitting users with low vision, color blindness, or other visual impairments, high color contrast ratios also make it possible for people with cognitive disabilities to read and understand content more easily.

Without adequate color contrast, disabled people may struggle to read or understand the content on your website. Low color contrast can make text difficult to distinguish from the background, leading to eyestrain, fatigue, and decreased readability. 

As a result, users with visual impairments may be unable to access information or navigate your website effectively, limiting their overall browsing experience and excluding them from engaging with your content.

Testing for Color Contrast

You can check the color contrast on your website using various online tools or browser extensions designed for accessibility testing such as our free Color Contrast Checker. 

These tools analyze the color values of text and background elements and calculate the color contrast ratio, highlighting whether the contrast meets or exceeds the minimum accessibility standards specified in guidelines such as the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG).

WCAG indicates that websites should have a minimum color contrast of 4:5:1 between text and the background. For larger text, the contrast should be 3:1. 

Infographic: color contrast check for websites

Remediating Your Website

Developers can fix the color contrast on a website by making CSS changes. Here is an example of a code change you would make to adjust color contrast on your site:

/* Increase text color contrast */

body {

    color: #333; /* Dark text color */

}

/* Ensure background color provides sufficient contrast */

.content {

    background-color: #fff; /* Light background color */

}

/* Adjust link color for better visibility */

a {

    color: #007bff; /* Adjust link color for sufficient contrast */

}

In this example, CSS styles are used to adjust text color, background color, and link color to ensure adequate color contrast for improved readability and accessibility. Dark text color (#333) is used on a light background (#fff), and link color is adjusted to provide sufficient contrast against the background. It’s essential to choose colors that meet recommended contrast ratios to enhance accessibility for all users.

4. Include Descriptive Page Titles

Businesses should have descriptive website titles for ADA web accessibility compliance because they enhance navigation and usability for all users, including those with disabilities. 

A descriptive page title provides users with meaningful information about the content on a webpage, making it easier to understand the purpose and context of the page. This improves accessibility by enabling users to navigate through websites more efficiently, especially when using assistive technologies such as screen readers.

Descriptive page titles benefit people with various disabilities, including:

  • Visual impairments: Users who rely on screen readers to access web content benefit from descriptive page titles, as they provide auditory cues about the content and context of the page.
  • Cognitive impairments: Users with cognitive disabilities may find it easier to navigate websites with descriptive page titles, as clear and informative titles help them understand the structure and organization of the site.

Without descriptive page titles, it can be challenging for disabled users to understand the purpose and context of each webpage on your site, leading to confusion, frustration, and inefficiency in navigating the site.

Testing for Descriptive Page Titles

You can evaluate whether a website has descriptive page titles by examining the title tags across your site. Are they clear and relevant to the content on that page? Would a user immediately know what type of content they can expect?

Remediating Your Website

Let’s look at a few examples of descriptive titles:

  • “About Us – Company Name”: The title clearly identifies the purpose of the page (providing information about the company) and includes the company name for branding and recognition.
  • “Contact Us – Customer Support”: The page title indicates that a user can use the details on this page to reach out to the company to receive customer support.
  • “Product Catalog – Category Name”: This title indicates the type of content (product catalog) and specifies the category or topic (e.g., electronics, clothing) for easy navigation.

5. Provide Explicit Labels for All Form Inputs

Providing explicit labels for form inputs is another requirement for complying with ADA web accessibility standards.

Labels help users understand the purpose and function of form fields, making it easier to complete forms accurately and efficiently. They provide context and guidance for users, especially those with disabilities who may rely on assistive technologies such as screen readers to navigate and interact with web content.

Form input labels benefit individuals with various disabilities, including:

  • Visual impairments: Users who rely on screen readers or magnification software benefit from explicit form input labels, as they provide auditory or visual cues about the type of information required for each form field.
  • Cognitive impairments: Users with cognitive disabilities may find it easier to understand and complete forms with clear and descriptive labels, reducing confusion and cognitive load.

Missing or unclear labels make it challenging for users to understand the purpose and expectations of each form field, leading to errors, frustration, and inefficient form completion. As a result, users with disabilities may be unable to submit forms or access the information or services they need, limiting their ability to interact with your website effectively.

Testing for Form Input Labels

To determine whether your forms meet the necessary web accessibility standards, it’s important to inspect the HTML code of your form elements. This will ensure you can verify the presence of label elements associated with each form field. You can also visually inspect the form fields on your site to ensure that each field has a visible and descriptive label.

Remediating Your Website

Along with ensuring that your forms have visual labels, here are some examples of the form elements that need to be present in your HTML code:

<label for=”name”>Name:</label>

<label for=”email”>Email:</label>

<label for=”password”>Password:</label>

<label for=”birthdate”>Date of Birth

6. Associate Form Instructions with Input

Businesses should associate form instructions with inputs for web accessibility because clear and concise instructions help users understand how to complete forms correctly, reducing errors and improving usability. 

Associating form instructions with inputs provides context and guidance, making it easier for users to navigate and interact with web forms, especially for individuals who rely on assistive technologies such as screen readers.

Form instructions benefit people with the following types of disabilities:

  • Cognitive impairments: Users with cognitive disabilities may find it easier to understand and follow instructions when completing forms as they reduce confusion.
  • Visual impairments: Users who rely on screen readers benefit from clear and descriptive instructions that provide auditory cues about the form structure and requirements.
  • Learning disabilities: Users with learning disabilities may require additional guidance and support when completing forms, and clear instructions can help them understand the form expectations and process.

A lack of instructions makes it challenging for users to understand the purpose and expectations of each form field, causing a frustrating experience. It can also prevent users from submitting their details and accessing important information or services on your site.

Testing for Form Instructions

Similar to input labels, developers can visually detect whether instructions are available on their forms. However, this is only the first step – HTML code should also be checked.

Developers can use HTML label elements or aria-label attributes to associate instructions with form inputs, ensuring they are accessible to assistive technologies. Using clear and concise language, avoiding jargon, and providing examples or additional context when necessary are also important. 

It’s also essential to test forms with a diverse group of users, including those with disabilities, to ensure that the instructions are understandable and effective.

Remediating Your Website

To add form instructions in HTML, you can use various methods, including placing descriptive text directly adjacent to form inputs or using the <label> element. This is what your HTML code would look like: 

<label for=”name”>Name:</label>

<input type=”text” id=”name” name=”name” aria-describedby=”name-instructions”>

<span id=”name-instructions”>Please enter your full name.</span>

In this example, the descriptive text “Please enter your full name.” is placed adjacent to the form input for the name field. The aria-describedby attribute is used to associate the descriptive text with the input field for accessibility.

7. Ensure Multimedia Content Has Appropriate Captioning and Audio Descriptions

If your website has multimedia content, complying with ADA web accessibility requirements means adding the appropriate captions and audio descriptions to these files.

Adding captions and audio descriptions to multimedia content makes it more perceivable and understandable to a wider audience. This inclusivity not only helps businesses comply with accessibility standards and regulations but also improves the user experience and creates a more inclusive online environment.

Captions primarily benefit people who are deaf or hard of hearing by providing a text-based alternative to spoken dialogue and sound effects. Audio descriptions benefit users who are blind or visually impaired by providing narrated descriptions of visual elements and actions occurring in multimedia content. 

Additionally, both captions and audio descriptions can benefit people with cognitive or learning disabilities who may benefit from multiple forms of information.

Without these alternative content formats, deaf or hard-of-hearing users as well as blind users may miss out on spoken dialogue, sound effects, or other auditory cues, leading to a misunderstanding of your content. 

Remediating Your Website

If you can’t see any captions or audio descriptions linked to your content, you will need to add them.

For captions, there are captioning tools or services that create synchronized text transcripts of spoken dialogue and sound effects. You can embed these captions directly into your multimedia content or provide them as separate text files that users can access.

For audio descriptions, write concise, descriptive narrations of visual elements, actions, and context in your multimedia content. Include these audio descriptions as separate audio tracks or embed them directly into the multimedia files.

Lastly, verify that multimedia players or platforms used on your website support captions and audio descriptions. Test the accessibility of your multimedia content with screen readers and other assistive technologies to ensure compatibility and usability for people with disabilities.

8. Ensure Tables Have Proper Header and Column Attributes

Proper header and column attributes in tables are essential for web accessibility compliance because they provide meaningful structure and context to assistive technologies, such as screen readers. 

Header and column attributes primarily benefit people with visual impairments, including those who are blind or have low vision. These attributes allow screen readers to convey the structure and relationships within tables, enabling users to understand the content being presented. 

Additionally, people with cognitive or learning disabilities may also benefit from clear and organized table structures provided by proper header and column attributes.

Without proper header and column attributes, individuals with visual impairments may struggle to interpret the information presented in tables on a website. Screen readers rely on these attributes to convey the table structure, headers, and data relationships. 

Without them, users may encounter challenges in understanding the content, navigating through rows and columns, and accessing relevant information within tables, leading to frustration and a poor user experience.

Testing for Table Attributes

You can check whether your website has tables with the correct header and column attributes by:

  • Using accessibility tools or browser extensions that analyze the accessibility of web content and identify any tables lacking the appropriate attributes.
  • Manually inspecting the HTML code of tables on your website to ensure the presence of <th> (table header) elements for column and row headers, and using the appropriate scope and id attributes to associate headers with data cells.

Remediating Your Website

Remediating the tables on your website will require a few changes at a code level. Here is what the code of a table would look like before and after remediation:

<!– Before remediation: –>

<table>

    <tr>

        <td>Month</td>

        <td>Sales</td>

    </tr>

    <tr>

        <td>January</td>

        <td>$1000</td>

    </tr>

    <!– More rows –>

</table>

 

<!– After remediation: –>

<table>

    <tr>

        <th scope=”col”>Month</th>

        <th scope=”col”>Sales</th>

    </tr>

    <tr>

        <th scope=”row”>January</th>

        <td>$1000</td>

    </tr>

    <!– More rows –>

</table>

In the remediated example, the <th> elements with the appropriate scope attributes indicate column headers, improving accessibility for users who rely on assistive technologies. Additionally, the use of scope=”row” attribute associates the header with the data in the first column of each row, further enhancing accessibility.

9. Maintain a Logical Tab Order

Having a logical tab order is essential for ADA web accessibility because it ensures that users can navigate through your website content using keyboard-only or keyboard-assisted methods. 

A logical tab order facilitates efficient and intuitive navigation, allowing users to access interactive elements, links, and form fields in a predictable sequence. 

A logical tab order primarily benefits people with mobility impairments or dexterity limitations who rely on keyboard navigation to access and interact with web content. People with visual impairments who use screen readers or other assistive technologies may also benefit from a logical tab order, as it enables them to navigate through website elements in a systematic and efficient manner.

Without a logical tab order, disabled people who rely on keyboard navigation may have difficulty navigating through website content in a predictable sequence, leading to disorientation and frustration.

An inability to access interactive elements, links, or form fields efficiently will also hinder their ability to complete tasks or access important information.

Testing for Logical Tab Order

You can check whether your website has a logical tab order by:

  • Using keyboard navigation: Navigate through your website using only the Tab key and observe whether the focus moves through interactive elements, links, and form fields in a logical and intuitive sequence.
  • Inspecting HTML structure: Review your website’s HTML code to ensure that interactive elements are structured in a logical order and that tabindex attributes follow a consistent and meaningful sequence.

Remediating Your Website

To apply a logical tab order to your website, you can take the following steps:

  • Ensure proper HTML structure: Use semantic HTML elements and proper nesting to create a logical hierarchy of website content.
  • Avoid tabindex misuse: Minimize the use of tabindex attributes and only apply them when necessary for custom interactive elements or specific navigation requirements.
  • Test keyboard navigation: Regularly test your website’s tab order using keyboard navigation to ensure that users can navigate through content in a logical and efficient manner.
  • Incorporate user feedback: Encourage feedback from users, including those with disabilities, to identify any navigation issues or challenges and make necessary improvements to the tab order on your site.

10. Use Unique and Contextual Links

Businesses should have unique and contextual links for web accessibility to ensure that all users, including those with disabilities, can understand the purpose and destination of each link. 

Unique and contextual links improve usability and navigation by providing clear and descriptive link text, helping users anticipate the content they will encounter when clicking the link. 

An increased reliance on trial-and-error methods to navigate through a website can be time-consuming and frustrating. It also limits a user’s ability to understand the relevance of links based on their surrounding content, making efficient navigation incredibly difficult.

Unique and contextual links primarily benefit people with cognitive disabilities, visual impairments, and users who rely on assistive technologies such as screen readers. Clear and descriptive link text allows these users to understand the context and relevance of each link, ensuring efficient navigation and interaction with your website content.

Testing for Unique and Contextual Links

You can check whether your website has unique and contextual links by:

  • Inspecting the HTML code: Review the anchor (<a>) elements in your HTML code to ensure that each link has descriptive and relevant link text that accurately conveys the destination or purpose of the link.
  • Using accessibility tools: Utilize automated accessibility tools or browser extensions that analyze the link text and provide feedback on its clarity, relevance, and uniqueness.

Remediating Your Website

Go through your website to test whether your links are clear and clearly describe the destination. Here are some examples of contextual link text:

  • “Read more about our company’s sustainability initiatives”
  • “Download the latest product catalog (PDF)”
  • “Contact us to schedule a consultation”
  • “Explore our FAQ section for answers to common questions”
  • “Visit our blog for industry insights and updates”

11. Provide Text Cues When Using Color In Text

Using text cues when using color in text is essential for ensuring accessibility and inclusivity on websites. Text cues provide additional context and clarity, especially for users who may have difficulty perceiving or distinguishing colors. 

Text cues when using color in text primarily benefit people with color vision deficiencies, such as color blindness, who may have difficulty distinguishing between certain colors. Additionally, text cues also benefit users with visual impairments who rely on screen readers or other assistive technologies.

Without text cues when using color in text, disabled people may encounter several challenges, including:

  • Difficulty understanding or interpreting content that relies solely on color to convey information, leading to confusion or misinterpretation of a message.
  • An inability to discern important information or cues that are conveyed exclusively through color, hindering their ability to fully engage with your content.
  • Limited access to critical content or functionality that may be obscured or inaccessible due to reliance on color alone for visual cues.

Testing for Text Cues

You can check whether a website has text cues when using color in text by reviewing your site’s content. 

Examine text elements, such as headings, labels, or instructions, to see if they include descriptive text alongside or instead of color cues.

You can also use an accessibility testing tool that assesses the contrast and readability of text elements and provides feedback on the presence of text cues when using color.

Remediating Your Website

Adding text cues to your website to ensure color is not used for meaning alone, you can make some adjustments to your HTML code.

<!– Before adding text cues: –>

<p style=”color: red;”>Important message</p>

<!– After adding text cues: –>

<p style=”color: red;”>Important message <span aria-hidden=”true”>(Important)</span></p>

In this example, a visually hidden span element with descriptive text “(Important)” is added alongside the colored text to provide a text cue for users who may not be able to perceive the color red. This ensures that the message is conveyed effectively to all users, including those with color vision deficiencies or visual impairments.

12. Use the Img Tag for All Relevant Images

Img tags are required for all relevant images to ensure accessibility for users with disabilities. The img tag allows for the inclusion of alternative text (alt text), which provides a textual description of the image content. 

Without img tags for all images, disabled people may encounter several accessibility barriers:

  • Screen reader users may not receive any information about the content or purpose of the images, leading to confusion or frustration when encountering image-only content.
  • Users with low vision may be unable to discern the details or significance of images without alternative textual descriptions, limiting their ability to fully engage with your content.
  • Individuals with certain cognitive or learning disabilities may also benefit from alt text provided via img tags, as it helps them understand the context and relevance of images within your content.

Testing for Img Tags

You can check whether your website uses img tags for all relevant images by inspecting the HTML code of your site. In most instances though, most CMS platforms automatically insert image tags when you upload images, so it’s highly unlikely they won’t be present without good reason. 

Remediating Your Website

This is what an img tag would look like in your HTML code:

<img src=”example.jpg” alt=”A group of people enjoying a picnic in the park”>

In this example, the img tag is used to embed an image (“example.jpg”) into the webpage, and the alt attribute provides a textual description (“A group of people enjoying a picnic in the park”) of the image content. This alt text ensures that the image is accessible to users who cannot view it visually, such as those using screen readers.

13. Nest Heading Elements Logically

Nesting heading elements logically is an important part of web accessibility because it helps convey the structure and hierarchy of content on a webpage. 

Properly nested headings provide a clear outline of the information presented on a page, making it easier for all users, including those with disabilities, to navigate and understand the content. Logical nesting enhances the readability, organization, and usability of web pages, contributing to a better user experience for everyone.

Nested heading elements benefit people with various disabilities, including visual impairments, cognitive disabilities, and users of assistive technologies such as screen readers. Clear and logical heading structure allows these users to better understand the relationships between different sections of content, navigate through a webpage more efficiently, and comprehend the overall structure and flow of information.

Testing for Nested Heading Elements

Turn to your HTML code to check whether your heading elements are nested in a logical order.

Your content should make use of H1, H2, and H3 headers in the correct order, with each heading level representing the most important headings in the relevant order.

Remediating Your Website

Here is an HTML example of how header tags should be used in the correct order:

<h1>Main Heading</h1>

<h2>Subheading 1</h2>

<h3>Sub-subheading 1.1</h3>

<h3>Sub-subheading 1.2</h3>

<h2>Subheading 2</h2>

<h3>Sub-subheading 2.1</h3>

In this example, the heading elements are nested in a logical hierarchy, with H1 representing the main heading and subsequent headings (H2, H3) representing subheadings and sub-subheadings. This structure helps convey the content’s organization and relationships in a clear and understandable way.

14. Allow Text Size Adjustment and Zoom Capability

Allowing text size adjustment and zoom capability is essential for web accessibility because it enables users to customize the display of your content according to their individual needs and preferences. 

Text size adjustment and zoom capability empower users to increase or decrease the size of text and other elements on a webpage, improving readability and usability for people with visual impairments, low vision, or age-related vision changes. 

This inclusive approach to design ensures that all users can comfortably access and interact with website content without encountering barriers related to font size or magnification.

Without text size adjustment and zoom capability, users with visual impairments or low vision may struggle to read small or low-contrast text, leading to eyestrain, fatigue, or difficulty accessing information.

Older adults or users with age-related vision changes may find it challenging to discern small text or details on a webpage, impacting their ability to navigate and interact with your content. 

Lastly, people with certain cognitive disabilities or learning differences may require larger text or simplified layouts to improve comprehension and facilitate navigation, which may not be possible without text size adjustment and zoom capability.

Testing for Text Size Adjustment and Zoom Capabilities

You can check whether a website offers text size adjustment and zoom capabilities by testing your website’s functionality.

Use standard browser features to adjust text size (e.g., Ctrl + “+” or Ctrl + “-” on Windows, Command + “+” or Command + “-” on Mac) and zoom level (e.g., Ctrl + mouse scroll or pinch-to-zoom on touch devices) to see if the changes are applied consistently and without it impacting your content or site’s functionality.

You can also explore your site’s existing accessibility settings, which may include built-in options to customize text size or zoom level. Look for accessibility options in your website’s settings menu or user preferences to adjust text size and zoom level as needed.

Remediating Your Website

Here is an example of code that sets the base font size to 16px for the body text and allows users to adjust text size using their browser settings. 

Responsive design techniques are also implemented to ensure that the layout adapts to different screen sizes, enabling users to zoom in or out without losing content or functionality.

/* CSS for enabling text size adjustment */

body {

    font-size: 16px; /* Base font size */

}

/* CSS for enabling zoom capability */

@media screen and (max-width: 767px) {

    /* Adjust layout for smaller screens */

    /* Example: Responsive design for mobile devices */

}

15. Set the Language for the Page

Businesses should set the language for a web page for web accessibility purposes because it helps assistive technologies and language-processing algorithms correctly interpret and present the content to users. 

Setting the language of your site, or individual web pages, ensures that screen readers, translation tools, and other assistive technologies can accurately pronounce or translate the text, enhancing the accessibility and usability of your website for users who may rely on these types of tools.

Users who rely on screen readers benefit from having the language of the page properly identified, as it allows a screen reader to use the correct pronunciation rules and language-specific features when reading the content out loud.

Even users with cognitive impairments will find it easier to understand and process content when it is presented in their preferred or native language, improving comprehension.

Testing for Language Settings

You can check whether your website has set a language for a page by inspecting the HTML code of your site. Look for the lang attribute within the <html> element, which specifies the language of the document. Additionally, some web browsers and accessibility tools may provide information about the language settings of a webpage.

Remediating Your Website

To set the language for a web page, you can follow these steps:

  • Identify the primary language of your content.
  • Add the lang attribute to the opening <html> tag of the webpage: 

<!DOCTYPE html>

<html lang=”en”>

<head>

    <meta charset=”UTF-8″>

    <title>Example Page</title>

</head>

<body>

    <!– Content of the webpage –>

</body>

</html>

  • Set the value of the lang attribute to the appropriate language code (e.g., “en” for English, “es” for Spanish).
  • You can also add the xml:lang attribute for XHTML documents to specify the language, but this is optional.
  • Ensure that the language attribute accurately reflects the primary language used throughout the content of any given webpage.

16. Set the Language for Sections On a Page That Differ From the Site Language

Developers also need to set the language for sections on a page that differ from the site language to ensure that assistive technologies and language-processing algorithms can interpret and present the content accurately. 

Setting the language for specific sections helps assistive technologies identify and apply the appropriate pronunciation rules, language-specific features, and text-to-speech settings, enhancing accessibility and usability for users who rely on these tools.

Users who rely on screen readers benefit the most from having the language of specific sections properly identified, ensuring accurate pronunciation and language-specific interpretation of your content.

Users with cognitive disabilities will also appreciate this setting as it makes your content easier to understand and process. 

Testing for Language Settings

You can check whether your website has set the language for specific sections on a page that differ from your site language by inspecting the HTML code of your site. 

Look for the lang attribute within specific elements, such as headings, paragraphs, or sections, to identify the language of each section. 

Remediating Your Website

Here is an example of code that highlights how you would set the language for a specific section on a page on your site:

<html lang=”en”>

<head>

    <title>Example Page</title>

</head>

<body>

    <h1 lang=”fr”>Bienvenue</h1>

    <p lang=”es”>Hola, bienvenido a nuestro sitio web.</p>

    <!– Additional content –>

</body>

</html>

In this example, the <h1> element is set to French (lang=”fr”) to indicate that the heading is in French, while the <p> element is set to Spanish (lang=”es”) to indicate that the paragraph is in Spanish. 

17. Name Frames Appropriately

Businesses should name frames appropriately to comply with ADA web accessibility requirements to provide context and navigation cues for users, especially those who rely on assistive technologies. 

Frames that are named correctly help users understand the purpose and content of each frame, improving navigation and the overall usability of the site.

Along with aiding users who rely on assistive technologies such as screen readers, properly named frames also benefit people with cognitive disabilities, making it easier for them to process information.

Undefined or ambiguous frame names make it challenging for users to understand the purpose and context of each frame, leading to confusion, frustration, and decreased accessibility for users with disabilities.

Testing for Frame Names

You can check whether your website has properly named frames by inspecting the HTML code of every webpage. 

Look for the <frame> or <iframe> elements and verify that each frame has a descriptive title attribute or a suitable name attribute. Some accessibility tools may provide information about frame names and their accessibility too.

Remediating Your Website

Let’s look at a code example of frames that have been correctly named:

<html>

<head>

    <title>Example Page with Frames</title>

</head>

<frameset cols=”25%,75%”>

    <frame src=”menu.html” title=”Main Menu”>

    <frame src=”content.html” title=”Main Content”>

</frameset>

</html>

In this example, two frames are defined within a frameset, each with a descriptive title attribute (title=”Main Menu” and title=”Main Content”). These titles provide meaningful names for the frames, helping users understand the purpose and content of each frame when navigating the website.

18. Ensure Compliance with Flashing Element Guidelines

WCAG outlines flashing element guidelines to ensure that businesses can prevent seizure triggers and other adverse reactions in users with photosensitive epilepsy or other sensory sensitivities. 

By following these guidelines, businesses demonstrate their commitment to creating a safe and inclusive online environment for all users, regardless of their disabilities.

The flashing element guidelines primarily benefit users with sensory sensitivities that are triggered by flashing or flickering content. However, these guidelines also indirectly benefit users with various other disabilities, including those with cognitive impairments or attention-related disorders, by reducing distractions and potential barriers to accessing web content.

Testing for Flashing Element Guidelines

You can check whether your website complies with the necessary flashing element guidelines in WCAG by inspecting your webpages for any flashing or rapidly changing content. 

Remediating Your Website

In the below example, a flashing effect is created using CSS animations. However, to comply with WCAG flashing element guidelines, developers should ensure that any flashing or rapidly changing content does not exceed the recommended flash and red flash thresholds specified in the guidelines.

<style>

.flashing-element {

    animation: pulse 1s infinite alternate;

}

@keyframes pulse {

    0% { opacity: 1; }

    100% { opacity: 0.5; }

}

</style>

<div class=”flashing-element”>

    <!– Content of the flashing element –>

</div>

19. Prevent Unexpected Timeouts On Your Site

Businesses should avoid unexpected timeouts on their site for web accessibility purposes to ensure that users, including those with disabilities, have sufficient time to interact with and complete tasks on a website. 

Unexpected timeouts can create barriers for users who may require more time to navigate through content, fill out forms, or complete transactions, making it more difficult for them to access and engage with a website effectively.

Avoiding unexpected timeouts benefits people with various disabilities, including but not limited to:

  • Motor impairments: Users who require extra time to navigate and interact with a website due to motor impairments or mobility issues benefit from extended time limits, as it allows them to complete tasks without feeling rushed or pressured.
  • Cognitive impairments: Users with cognitive disabilities may require additional time to process information, make decisions, and complete tasks on a website. Avoiding unexpected timeouts ensures that these users have sufficient time to comprehend content and perform actions without feeling overwhelmed or frustrated.

Simply put, a website with unexpected timeouts offers a poor user experience. Timeouts can disrupt the user’s browsing experience and prevent them from completing tasks within the allotted time frame. 

Testing for Unexpected Timeouts

To determine whether your website has unexpected timeouts, conduct usability testing, monitor user feedback, and analyze your website analytics to identify user behavior patterns and engagement. Accessibility tools can also be used to gauge whether unexpected timeouts are occurring.

Remediating Your Website

Unexpected timeouts can be remediated by implementing user-friendly time limits and providing users with adequate warnings and options to extend or adjust the time limit as needed. 

Developers can also improve website performance and optimize loading times to reduce the likelihood of unexpected timeouts occurring during user interactions. 

Another step is to provide clear instructions, feedback messages, and error-handling mechanisms that can help users understand and navigate through time-limited tasks more effectively, enhancing the overall accessibility and usability of your website.

20. Avoid Trapping Keyboard Focus in Loops on a Website

By trapping keyboard focus in loops on a website, businesses could be in violation of ADA web accessibility requirements. 

It’s important to avoid this to ensure users can navigate through content and interactive elements using keyboard-only or keyboard-assistive technologies. Trapping keyboard focus in loops can prevent users from accessing certain parts of the website, causing frustration and limiting their ability to interact with your site effectively.

By not trapping keyboard focus in loops on your website, you are benefitting the following users:

  • Motor impairments: Users who rely on keyboard navigation due to motor impairments benefit from being able to move focus to different interactive elements on your website without getting stuck in loops, allowing them to navigate and interact with content more efficiently.
  • Visual impairments: Users who use screen readers or other keyboard-assistive technologies benefit from a logical and predictable focus order. Trapping focus in loops can disrupt their browsing experience and make it difficult to access and understand your content.

Testing for Keyboard Loops

To test whether your website may be creating keyboard loops, navigate through your site using only a keyboard and observe whether the focus becomes stuck or trapped within certain elements, preventing you from moving to other parts of the page. 

Additionally, you can use browser developer tools to inspect your website’s HTML code and JavaScript event handlers to identify any instances of focus trapping.

Remediating Your Website

Here is an example of code that prevents keyboard focus from getting stuck in a loop:

<div id=”modal” tabindex=”-1″ aria-labelledby=”modal-title” role=”dialog”>

    <div role=”document”>

        <h2 id=”modal-title”>Modal Dialog</h2>

        <button id=”close-btn”>Close</button>

        <!– Modal content –>

    </div>

</div>

In this example, the modal dialog has a tabindex=”-1″ attribute, which allows it to receive keyboard focus programmatically but prevents it from being included in the natural tab order. 

When the modal is closed (e.g., by clicking the “Close” button), keyboard focus should be returned to the appropriate element on the page outside the modal, preventing it from getting trapped in a loop. Additionally, JavaScript event handlers can be used to manage focus behavior and ensure a smooth and accessible user experience.

21. Conduct Accessibility Checks

It’s important for businesses to conduct regular accessibility checks to ensure that their websites are inclusive and usable for all users, regardless of their abilities or disabilities. 

By conducting accessibility tests, businesses can identify and address barriers or issues that may prevent users with disabilities from accessing and interacting with web content effectively. Ensuring web accessibility not only enhances the user experience but also helps businesses comply with legal requirements and industry standards, improves brand reputation, and expands their target audience.

Comply with the ADA’s web accessibility requirements benefits users with multiple disabilities, including:

  • Visual impairments: Testing ensures that your web content is perceivable through alternative means, such as screen readers or magnification software, allowing users with visual impairments to access and understand your content effectively.
  • Hearing impairments. When your site is accessible, people who are deaf or hard of hearing can still engage with your content, including audio content, thanks to captions and transcripts.
  • Motor impairments: Testing verifies that your web content is operable via keyboard navigation or alternative input methods, enabling users with motor impairments to navigate and interact with your website without relying on a mouse.
  • Cognitive impairments: Lastly, regular web accessibility testing means your content is understandable and predictable for people with cognitive or learning impairments, enhancing comprehension.

Without proper testing, your website may lack essential accessibility features, such as alternative text for images, keyboard navigation support, or semantic markup, making it difficult or impossible for users with disabilities to use your site independently.

Testing for Web Accessibility

There are two main ways that you can conduct web accessibility testing. The first is using automated tools, which automatically scan your website to detect issues. Some automated tools will also provide you with detailed reports that outline all of the issues on your site and include guidelines on how to correct them.

The second is to conduct a manual audit, which is more in-depth and will look at all aspects of your website from a code level as well as a user’s perspective.

22. Provide a Way to Report Web Accessibility Issues

Businesses should provide a way for users to report web accessibility issues to demonstrate their commitment to inclusivity and to ensure that all users, including those with disabilities, have a voice in identifying and addressing accessibility barriers. 

User-reported accessibility issues provide valuable feedback that can help businesses improve the accessibility of their websites, enhance the user experience for all users, and demonstrate responsiveness to the needs of users with disabilities.

Providing users with the ability to report web accessibility issues benefits users with various disabilities, including those with visual, hearing, cognitive, and mobility impairments.

Remediating Your Website

Businesses can let users report web accessibility issues through various channels, including:

  • Contact forms: Provide a dedicated contact form on your site where users can submit reports of accessibility issues.
  • Email: Allow users to send emails to a designated accessibility contact or support address to report issues and provide feedback.
  • Online chat or support: Offer live chat support or online support services where users can communicate directly with a representative to report accessibility issues in real-time.
  • Accessibility feedback widget: Implement an accessibility feedback widget or toolbar on the website that allows users to report issues and provide feedback directly from the webpage they are viewing.
  • Social media: Encourage users to report accessibility issues through your social media channels by providing specific hashtags or handles for accessibility-related inquiries and feedback.

Infographic: Guidelines for reporting web accessibility issues

23. Tag Multimedia Content Appropriately

Another ADA web accessibility requirement is that multimedia content needs to be tagged appropriately. It ensures that users with disabilities can access and understand content more effectively. 

Tags provide descriptive text alternatives for multimedia elements, enabling assistive technologies like screen readers to convey the information to users who cannot perceive the content visually or audibly. Proper tagging also enhances search engine optimization (SEO) and improves the overall user experience for all visitors.

Tagging multimedia content benefits users who are blind or have low vision and rely on screen readers to interpret web content. Properly tagged multimedia content ensures that screen readers can convey the information through alternative text descriptions, allowing visually impaired users to understand the content. 

It also benefits users who are deaf or hard of hearing and rely on captions or transcripts to access audio content. 

Testing for Multimedia Content Tags

You can determine whether your website has tagged multimedia content appropriately by inspecting the HTML code of the webpage and verifying the presence of tags such as <img> for images, <video> for videos, and <audio> for audio files. 

Developers can also use accessibility tools that analyze web content for accessibility issues, including the presence of alternative text for images and captions or transcripts for multimedia files.

Remediating Your Website

In the below example, the <img> element is tagged with an alt attribute, providing a description of the image for users who cannot see it. 

The <video> and <audio> elements include the controls attribute for playback control, and additional sources are provided for compatibility with different browsers and devices. Captions or transcripts can be added within the <video> or <audio> elements to provide alternative content for users with disabilities.

<img src=”example.jpg” alt=”Description of the image”>

<video controls>

    <source src=”example.mp4″ type=”video/mp4″>

    Your browser does not support the video tag.

</video>

<audio controls>

    <source src=”example.mp3″ type=”audio/mpeg”>

    Your browser does not support the audio tag.

</audio>

24. Make Pages Useable Without CSS

Businesses should make webpages usable without CSS for web accessibility purposes to ensure that users can access and interact with the content effectively, even if they have limitations or disabilities that affect their ability to perceive or interpret visual styles. 

By providing a functional and accessible layout without relying solely on CSS for presentation, businesses enhance the usability and inclusivity of their websites for all users, including those who use assistive technologies or have limited access to visual content.

A website that doesn’t rely on CSS benefits individuals with various disabilities, particularly those with: :

  • Visual impairments: Users who are blind or have low vision may rely on screen readers or magnification software that doesn’t interpret CSS styles. Ensuring that content remains accessible and structured without CSS allows these users to navigate and understand a webpage effectively.
  • Cognitive impairments: Users with cognitive disabilities may find complex or visually distracting layouts difficult to process. Simplifying the presentation and ensuring content hierarchy remains clear without CSS can improve comprehension and reduce cognitive load for these users.

Testing Site Usability Without CSS

To test whether your website is still usable without CSS, disable CSS styles in your web browser and observe how your site’s content and functionality are affected. Accessibility tools can also help you test this aspect.

Remediating Your Website

Developers can ensure a website is usable without CSS by following best practices for semantic HTML markup and progressive enhancement techniques. This includes:

  • Using semantic HTML elements to structure content logically and ensure accessibility for users who rely on assistive technologies.
  • Providing meaningful text alternatives for images, links, and other non-text content to ensure accessibility and comprehensibility.
  • Implementing responsive design principles to ensure that content remains accessible and usable across a variety of devices and screen sizes, regardless of CSS styling.
  • Using CSS for presentation and layout enhancements, but ensuring that essential content and functionality remain accessible and usable without CSS enabled.

25. Provide Links to Required Plugins on a Page

By providing links to required plugins on a webpage, it ensures all users can access and install the necessary software or extensions needed to interact with multimedia content or other interactive features on your website.

This empowers users to take the necessary steps to access and engage with your content, regardless of their technological capabilities or assistive technology setup.

Users who rely on screen readers or magnification software may require plugins to access multimedia content or interactive features that are not natively supported by their assistive technologies. Providing links to required plugins ensures that visually impaired users can access and engage with the content effectively.

People with cognitive disabilities may also require additional support or tools to interact with complex multimedia content or interactive elements. 

Testing for Plugin Links

You can check whether your website has provided links to required plugins by inspecting your site for any references or instructions related to plugin installation or compatibility. 

Look for links, buttons, or text prompts that indicate the need to download or install specific plugins to access multimedia content or interactive features. 

Remediating Your Website

Developers should provide links to required plugins on a webpage in a clear and accessible manner, ensuring that users can easily locate and access the necessary software or extensions. This can be achieved by:

  • Including descriptive text or labels that clearly indicate the purpose of the link (e.g., “Download Adobe Flash Player”).
  • Using standard hyperlink styling or buttons to visually distinguish the links from other content on a webpage.
  • Providing alternative text for the links to ensure accessibility for users who rely on screen readers or other assistive technologies.
  • Ensuring that the links are functional and point to the correct download or installation page for the required plugins.
  • Placing the links in a prominent location on a webpage, such as near the multimedia content or interactive features that require the plugins for optimal accessibility and usability.

26. Accessible PDF Files

Web accessibility encompasses all elements on your site, including PDF documents. It’s essential to provide accessible PDF files so that all users can access and understand the content presented in PDF format. 

Accessible PDF files enhance inclusivity by providing features such as text alternatives, proper document structure, and navigational aids that enable users with disabilities to perceive, understand, and interact with the content effectively. 

Accessible PDF files benefit individuals with various disabilities, including but not limited to:

  • Visual impairments: Users who are blind or have low vision rely on screen readers or magnification software to access digital content. Accessible PDF files provide structured content, alternative text descriptions for images, and proper reading order, enabling visually impaired users to navigate and comprehend the content effectively.
  • Motor impairments: Many users with motor disabilities rely on keyboard navigation or assistive technologies to interact with PDF content. Accessible PDF files ensure that interactive elements, such as form fields or hyperlinks, are accessible via keyboard input, allowing users with motor impairments to interact with the content without difficulty.
  • Cognitive impairments: Users with cognitive disabilities may benefit from the simplified layouts, clear headings, and consistent formatting provided in accessible PDF files.

Testing for PDF Accessibility

You can use a PDF testing tool or even software such as Adobe Acrobat to test for PDF accessibility. 

You want to look for elements such as alternative text for images, proper document structure using headings and lists, readable text with sufficient color contrast, and accessible form fields and links. 

Remediating Your PDFs

You can make your PDF files accessible by following some general best practices:

  • Add alternative text descriptions to images and other non-text content.
  • Provide a logical document structure using headings, lists, and tables.
  • Ensure sufficient color contrast for text and background elements.
  • Add descriptive link text and accessible form fields.
  • Enable document properties and metadata for navigation and searchability.
  • Use accessible fonts and styles for readability.
Unlock a PDF accessibility quote in 24 hours or less!
Take advantage of our awesome partnership deals! We’ll send your PDF to several companies and get you the best quote they can offer!

Where Do I Download the ADA Requirements Checklist for Websites?

To help summarize the ADA web accessibility requirements outlined in this document and make it easier for you to test and remediate your website, you can download a comprehensive PDF checklist here.

We continuously update this checklist to ensure your site is complying with the latest requirements. The latest version was updated in 2024. 

What Are the ADA Tools That Make Your Website ADA Compliant?

accessibe logoaccessiBe
  • WCAG
  • ADA
  • Section 508

Trusted by well over 247,000 website owners and brands, accessiBe is a leading provider of web accessibility solutions, ensuring businesses are compliant with the latest web accessibility standards.

accessiBe’s AI analyzes and scans websites using contextual understanding and recognition, ensuring they’re perceivable, robust, understandable, and operable. Along with ensuring websites are compatible with assistive technologies, accessiBe offers an accessibility widget for UI and design remediation, giving website users more control over their experience.

Site owners will also receive an accessibility statement & certification of performance. 

accessiBe plans start from $490 per year for websites with fewer than 1,000 pages

Pros

  • 2-minute installation process with any website platform
  • Trusted by thousands of industry-leading brands
  • User-friendly interface
  • Free trial

Cons

  • Poor video control from user interface
  • Lack of support for dynamic content
  • Incompatibility with some web apps

Existing Clients

Userway service logoUserWay
  • WCAG
  • ADA
  • Section 508

This automated, AI-powered solution is another firm favorite among businesses of all sizes. Like many other of the top tools, UserWay ensures your site is ADA Title 3, Section 508, and WCAG 2.2 compliant. 

UserWay’s accessibility monitoring scans your site for ADA compliance to help your developers monitor and fix any web accessibility issues related to the layout of and the content on your site. An accessibility overlay can also be added to your site to provide users with the option to customize their experience. 

After remediating your website, UserWay can help you generate an accessibility statement. 

Plans start from $490 per year for websites with up to 100K pages

Pros

  • Installed on over 1M+ websites
  • Multiple accessibility solutions offered
  • Free trial available
  • Easy to install
  • Supports multiple languages

Cons

  • Interface and solutions can be overwhelming initially
  • Does not support mobile apps
  • Regular automated site scans not offered

Existing Clients

Summary

Thanks to technological advancements, achieving ADA Title III compliance has never been easier.

Thankfully, your business’s compliance journey will open your business to an entirely new world of users, innovative practices, opportunities, and more, all while protecting you from possible ADA compliance lawsuits. 

So what are you waiting for?

Frequently Asked Questions

To be ADA compliant is the legal responsibility of certain businesses to be accessible to the disabled, by complying with the American Disabilities Act of 1990 (the “ADA”).

Signed into law in 1990 by former President George Bush, the ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) has officially been around for over 30 years. The act aims to increase access and opportunities for people living with disabilities across their personal and professional lives.

To apply for ADA protection, you need to prove that you have an impairment that would limit or restrict you from performing day-to-day activities. In terms of job discrimination, employees need to be qualified to perform specific duties or functions to benefit from ADA protection.

 

Subscribe
Notify of
guest
10 Comments
Oldest
Newest
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Ivanka
Ivanka
1 year ago

Wow! Just realized that my website has only 24% accessibility. Great article and advices. Thanks!

Danny Trichter
Danny Trichter
Admin
Reply to  Ivanka
1 year ago

Thanks Ivanka. We hope our checker helped you find where you are vulnerable and how to fix it. Good luck on your digital accessibility journey!

Tetiana
Tetiana
1 year ago

A very intuitive and helpful guide!

Danny Trichter
Danny Trichter
Admin
Reply to  Tetiana
1 year ago

Thank you very much for the kind words

Rachel
Rachel
1 year ago

Thank you for this article. My Web Design and UX students will be doing an assignment based on the info here. I’m hoping to teach a new wave of web designers who care about the accessibility of their sites!

Danny Trichter
Danny Trichter
Admin
Reply to  Rachel
1 year ago

Thank you very much Rachel and good luck!

Julia Davis
Julia Davis
1 year ago

This was a very informative blog and I really enjoyed reading it.

The evolution of the internet has shifted the relationship between publishers and consumers to a new level and by seeing the growth of websites and their users across the globe, webmasters need to make their services accessible to their consumers.

Danny Trichter
Danny Trichter
Admin
Reply to  Julia Davis
1 year ago

Thank you Julia, I think you are right and webmasters should pay attention to it a lot more than they are now! That is what we are here for!

Ethan
Ethan
1 year ago

Great job on putting together such a thorough and useful guide!

Danny Trichter
Danny Trichter
Admin
Reply to  Ethan
1 year ago

Thank you very much Ethan!